The Combat Jack Show: The Lord Jamar Episode

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Lord Jamar talks Brand Nubian, the role that Grand Puba played and how the Nubians were able to create the classic ‘In God We Trust’ album. We also talk 5 Percenter history and where the nation is in 2014. Finally we tackle his controversial views on gays and whites in hip hop. It ain’t pretty and this is an official disclaimer that Lord Jamar’s views aren’t shared by The Combat Jack Show. But as always, we keep it #Newmanati.

About Combat Jack

Attorney, author and radio personality Reggie Ossé is an established authority in all things urban entertainment. He is considered the first in today’s new wave of savvy attorneys well versed and nurtured in Urban, Hip Hop and Popular culture. He is the author of “Bling, The Hip Hop Jewelry Book”, a cultural anthropology coffee table book which provides an in depth and entertaining study of man’s fascination with jewelry spanning back to the birth of civilization.

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  • KM

    The majority of the conversation was about Lord Jamar’s career which was fascinating because he’s a brilliant artist.
    However his current views are both extraordinary and polarizing.

    Although he does not hate Gays is he concerned that he will incite hate that his views will shape the behavior of the unbalanced ppl out here.
    Gays seem to be constantly reduced to just a sexual act in the conversation and I think that makes us forget to be human. Especially the unbalanced ppl out here.

    I see a lot vitriol and I think we have to look at that.

    Does he feel like his consistent use of gay slurs hurts his message? I think he has done things on Vlad’s show that detract from his ability to articulate and what an intellect he truly is. Gay slurs take you off mssg. Because for the ppl out here that are trying to understand Lord Jamar the gay slurs make them turn the channel.

    Its not enough to say ppl use the N word n other hateful words,

    But thats not an answer,we as Black ppl we embrace, teach thru intellect,organize. I think the use of all slurs is anti-intellectual.

    I agree that none of this is about agreement. Agreement is not always a good thing.
    the fact that he has a point of view and he’s not bashful about sharing it is a good thing and its refreshing in this mimicry society we live in.
    Just wonder about delivery of the message.

    lastly In his mind what does the process look like with both gays and whites entering into hip hop. How is the respect established.
    We lack the unity we once had. Ppl dont pick up the phone they tweet each other.
    they too scared to even @ each other.

    We don’t even do posse cuts anymore thats how ego driven it has all become.
    Hip Hop has been so loose so ppl do what they like.

    In the early years there were more of us on the same page and reading the same book… So what does that process look like whats his vision for the future of gays and whites in hip hop. Or does he want to effectively preclude gay themes in hip hop.

    Great episode

    • Grandfather Cloc

      i agree with what your saying on the usage of words to display his message but the overall message (as far as the gay thing goes) is the de- emasculation of black men seen through younger black eyes. which i totally think is the next attack. As far as whites in the HOP we have to be aware of what happened to other genres of music when blacks were the creative force. I think it is all about awareness and that is something that the current generation doesn’t have do to popular media’s “we are all one, everything is o.k.” agenda with youth. Folks like Jamar need to be around because i feel like how they said “you pull out a thread on a sweater, eventually there will be no sweater”.

      • http://www.UncleSamMC.com/ Uncle Sam

        Would the argument then be that whites have already been feminized? Rock music has been fuckin w/ makeup & drag for decades now. I really think it’s just that music isn’t selling so you need a gimmick/controversy.

        • Grandfather Cloc

          oh i don’t doubt that controversy sells. in fact that excuse or fact is actually then small thread. we right it off as just that and 20 years later there is a bigger problem. as far as rock being feminized by whites I pose the question how often are youth (black white whatever) exposed to heroic masculine white men? Television, history books, movies, CEO’s the list goes on. There is not a balance in what black youth see in black males. The majority are shown as criminal, disrespectful to women, unintelligent, and soon to be (pay attention to sports not just the NFL) gay, while we have a black president to somehow even the score. My point is black youth are shown more of how not to be a man than how to actually be one. At this point in our time by default whites “feminizing” rock has no impact on those that look up to white males.

        • Grandfather Cloc

          I would say that controversy has a real factor in selling music. in fact if that is the small thread we might have to deal with twenty years from now. Do i believe that is what Jamar is doing, no. he has always had this stance. As far as whites feminizing rock music I ask how many times do the youth (of all races) get to see the white male as a hero or masculine be it through everyday television, movies, history books, your owners and CEO’s of businesses? Black youth get to see the majority of black males as criminals, jobless, disrespectful of women, unintelligent and soon to be (pay attention to sports not just the NFL) gay, while we have a black president to even the score?. To date black boys are not shown a balanced portrayal of how to be men. We can say that should start at the home but the reality is most black youth are in a single parent home or are so bombarded with pop-culture that it plays a significant role in how they see the world. If the media will constantly give these images of black men to youth how can we expect them to grow up as men?

      • KM

        hey there
        I agree there is no question that we need men like Lord Jamar.
        this is not about silencing a GOD its about refining the message.
        He has a point of view and its refreshing. however with all the hateful slurs the
        message regarding protecting Black Male Masculinity gets lost.

        I think Lord Jamar is a meaningful person and he needs to be asked Intentional questions.

        I don’t think anyone should set out to try and change his mind but I think
        having a meaningful discussion is pivotal because it can’t be attained on twitter.

        Lord Jamar is built for combat and debate and I think debate is necessary.

        There is continual theft and dilution of our music by white artist.
        It is almost impossible to sum it up in a few lines.
        The current consumer Black and White are buying Macklemore and Justin Timberlake.
        Vanilla Ice made whatever kind of music he wanted n sold well but WE (the culture) rejected It…Resistance is a beautiful word.
        now if we reject Macklemore we are labeled haters or worse.
        what we failed to pass down was a healthy respect for the Art form and the Community of hip hop.
        Being Gay and Race to me is the least of our problems with the state of hip hop music.

        Thats why I am interested in hearing Lord Jamars perspective on the future.

        Shiny Suit era, Get Money, kicked in the door for artist to seek a pop audience and try to reach as many ppl as possible. The awareness you speak of goes out the window when the only concern is getting money and being popular.

        this mindset gave birth to the double agent Less concerned with lyrics,teaching,authenticity,and originality.

        The level of sophistication in the audience perished.

        blame the fans? blame the artist? I don’t know, what I do know, it’s all a manifestation and We Here Now.

    • KM

      hey there
      I agree there is no question that we need men like Lord Jamar.
      this is not about silencing a GOD its about refining the message.
      He has a point of view and its refreshing. however with all the hateful slurs the
      message regarding protecting Black Male Masculinity gets lost.

      I think Lord Jamar is a meaningful person and he needs to be asked Intentional questions.

      I don’t think anyone should set out to try and change his mind but I think
      having a meaningful discussion is pivotal because it can’t be attained on twitter.

      Lord Jamar is built for combat and debate and I think debate is necessary.

      There is continual theft and dilution of our music by white artist.
      It is almost impossible to sum it up in a few lines.
      The current consumer Black and White are buying Macklemore and Justin Timberlake.
      Vanilla Ice made whatever kind of music he wanted n sold well but WE (the culture) rejected It…Resistance is a beautiful word.
      now if we reject Macklemore we are labeled haters or worse.
      what we failed to pass down was a healthy respect for the Art form and the Community of hip hop.
      Being Gay and Race to me is the least of our problems with the state of hip hop music.

      Disposable

      Thats why I am interested in hearing Lord Jamars perspective on the future.

      Shiny Suit era, Get Money, kicked in the door for artist to seek a pop audience and try to reach as many ppl as possible. The awareness you speak of goes out the window when the only concern is getting money and being popular.

      this mindset gave birth to the double agent Less concerned with lyrics,teaching,authenticity,and originality.

      The level of sophistication in the audience perished.

      blame the fans? blame the artist? I don’t know, what I do know, it’s all a manifestation and We Here Now.

  • Cheaustin

    I 1000% disagree with Lord Jamar but this was a fascinating episode.

  • knomtawkinbout

    Who said it more:
    A. “At the end of the day…” – Wyclef Jean
    B. “You know what I mean?” – Lord Jamar

  • COLD 4O

    smh Dallas gotta lotta nerve talkin bout ” Public Enemy aint get no pussy and no panties ” best believe Chuck and Griff had Latifah, Lyte, Monie Love,Salt, Pepa, Spinderella, JJ Fad, The Wee Papa Girls, and The Cookie Crew bussin it wide open homeboy! I hope Chuck, Griff, Terminator X, The Media Assassin Harry Allen, and the S1W’s bum rush the show and we gon see what it is Dallas… You already hid at the crib when Duck Down came around my man you better cool it! word

  • Kweli

    It’s incredible how CJ talks about language gays find offensive when he uses the nigga word like it’s going out of style.

  • http://skunkandburningtires.com/ Ju-osh M.

    Lord Jamar made one of my all-time favorite records. Damn if it doesn’t make me sick to hear his quote/unquote “reasonable” take on homosexuality.

    He agrees that “faggot” is as hurtful a word as “nigger,” yet uses it ad nauseam.

    Regarding having a gay child, he ignorantly proclaims, “Nobody wants that.” WRONG. Many, MANY folks do NOT care either way.

    He likens Mackelmore’s song about Gays to Nazi propaganda — and truly believes he’s making a valid point!

    Honestly, listening to Jamar speak on this podcast reminded me of listening that 70-something year old KKK guy in the Netflix documentary, The Last White Knight — it’s fear disguised as righteousness, hate described as love, an intelligent veneer laid on an outdated and ignorant rhetoric.

  • Space Mack

    How come Combat Jack is not making fun of 5 percenters and talking about how he doesn’t rock with their teachings.

  • Limocrash

    god damn!!!
    nigga KM wrote an entire newspaper in’nis bitch
    great episode tho

    • KM

      ;) Yes I did …it’s my passion for hip hop music and genuine love and respect for Lord Jamar
      5 – Power/Refinement

  • El Rojo

    Bun B and Pimp C are from Texas!!!! Not westcoast! Great interview….